[Answer] Where was the first permanent English settlement in America?

 1 : Introduction to the question “Where was the first permanent English settlement in America?
…1. Saint Augustine, Florida 2. Plymouth, Massachusetts 3. Jamestown, Virginia 4. Salem, Massachusetts
Where was the first permanent English settlement in America?

Jamestown, Virginia – Jamestown, Virginia, was the site of the first permanent English settlement in America. Under the orders of King James I, a group of 104 people departed London for the New World to establish a settlement in the Chesapeake area. They arrived at Jamestown Island on May 14, 1607, and began the arduous task of building a fort while also learning to survive in a new land. To complicate things further, the local Powhatan tribe attacked soon after their arrival. In time the fort came to be and settlers even established trade with their former attackers, securing a small supply of food. Things took a steep turn for the worse in the winter of 1609 when famine, disease, and attacks by the local Powhatan tribe killed nearly two-thirds of the residents. Critical food shortages were brought on by a prolonged drought and worsened when an additional 300 settlers arrived earlier in the year. Settlers couldn’t venture out of the settlement for food in fear of Powhatan attacks so they were forced to bunker down and suffer through starvation. Diseases like dysentery ran rampant, easily spreading through the weakened settlers. At the end of the winter, a mere 60 souls survived within the walls of Jamestown.:

Where was the first permanent English settlement in America?

The Correct Answer is

Jamestown, Virginia – Jamestown, Virginia, was the site of the first permanent English settlement in America. Under the orders of King James I, a group of 104 people departed London for the New World to establish a settlement in the Chesapeake area. They arrived at Jamestown Island on May 14, 1607, and began the arduous task of building a fort while also learning to survive in a new land. To complicate things further, the local Powhatan tribe attacked soon after their arrival. In time the fort came to be and settlers even established trade with their former attackers, securing a small supply of food. Things took a steep turn for the worse in the winter of 1609 when famine, disease, and attacks by the local Powhatan tribe killed nearly two-thirds of the residents. Critical food shortages were brought on by a prolonged drought and worsened when an additional 300 settlers arrived earlier in the year. Settlers couldn’t venture out of the settlement for food in fear of Powhatan attacks so they were forced to bunker down and suffer through starvation. Diseases like dysentery ran rampant, easily spreading through the weakened settlers. At the end of the winter, a mere 60 souls survived within the walls of Jamestown.:

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

Vietnameasyridertrip